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Massive solar storm set to hit Earth today: Brace for possible radio and internet blackouts

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December starts with a celestial jolt – US researchers warn of impending solar storm with potential disruptions

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The news of the impending solar storm was relayed by space weather physicist Dr. Tamitha Skov, who alerted her followers on X (formerly Twitter) about the potential disruptions. Dr. Skov emphasized that if the magnetic field aligns correctly, the solar storm, or coronal mass ejection (CME), could reach deep into mid-latitudes, leading to auroras and possible issues with amateur radio, GPS reception, and communication systems.

“The storm is predicted to hit Earth by midday December 1… If the magnetic field is oriented correctly, expect aurora to reach deep into mid-latitudes,” she stated. “Amateur radio and GPS reception issues are likely, especially on Earth’s nightside. Along with two earlier storms already en route, [this] means we have a 1,2,3-punch.”

Explaining the severity of the storm, Dr. Skov used the G-scale, where G3 signifies a strong magnetic storm. The NOAA joined in to share videos and photos of potential auroras that could be visible in the sky, a stunning side effect of solar storms.

“With 3 CMEs already inbound, the addition of a 4th, full halo CME has prompted SWPC forecasters to upgrade the G2 Watch on 01 Dec to a G3 Watch. G3 (strong) conditions are now likely on 01 Dec,” the NOAA posted.

Solar storms, generated by explosive events on the Sun, can disrupt communication systems, and the upcoming storm is linked to a strong flare near ‘Region 3500’ on the Sun. Dr. Skov hinted at a potential G3-G4 level impact, considering the presence of two solar storms preceding this one.

As Earth braces for this celestial event, there’s a chance for sky gazers to witness beautiful auroras resulting from the solar storm.

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